Mohamed Mahmoud

This tag is associated with 3 posts

This is the Egypt you don’t read about from AP.

 

Filmed in front of the immense concrete block wall that was erected in December during the violence in the area of the Ministry of the Interior. Separating Mohamed Mahmoud street from Tahrir Square the wall was placed as a barrier between protesters accepted territory of the square, acquired after enduring many attacks on them in the space of Tahrir during the spring and summer of 2011. Now relegated by the military authorities (SCAF) and media to be the only legitimate place for demonstration, it no longer has power as a tool for pressuring those in control. This wall sought to create a red line over which Egyptians could not cross, protecting and exempting the Ministry of Interior (as currently they are with the Ministry of Defense in Abbasiya) from attempts by the public to push for credibility, transparency, and reform, demands that have always been core to the revolution from before it even hit the streets. The wall was appropriated by Egyptians, first through graffiti, mural, now thoroughly added to the cultural landscape of the revolution and the ephemeral downtown Cairo.

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An Emerging Memorial Space? In Praise of Mohammed Mahmud Street

An Emerging Memorial Space? In Praise of Mohammed Mahmud Street.

There is truth to what they say about the Egyptian army being the best in the world.

Finally ventured out to try to gather things from my apartment 3 blocks away. The neighborhood watch is back and you can feel the heightened stress since the influx of Mubarak thugs who had controlled our street from last night through most of today. They are extremely suspicious of anyone they don’t know and as the situation has developed the watchmen have rotated. After much deliberation, returnign to the apartment to prove we live here he asked us about our work and not understanding the concept of refugee (“political immigrant” is the direct Arabic translation) he got freaked out and we ended up being taken to the military stationed down the road. The calm with which the soldiers approached the situation is unbelievable considering the recent developments and the fact that they are mostly around the age of 20. They asked the various neighborhood men who were all clamoring to talk over one another and explain themselves and our situation to leave us. They asked us questions and after they understood who we are they gave us an escort through the street back to our flat, smoothing our process through the checkpoints, several though we are talking about only a distance of two blocks. The whole experience has reassured me that they are still operating with same standard of excellence I have witnessed through out despite their recent inaction to control the attacks by government supported pro-Mubarak protesters.

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